Reviews

Reviews

Giove in Argo Handel
London Handel Festival (Britten Theatre) March 2015

Other stars of the year are even younger, and I can’t remember a better time for talent pouring out of the music colleges. In student productions, mezzo Kezia Bienek, Callas-like in temperament, and tenor Gyula Rab excelled in one of the two casts for the Royal College of Music’s totally accomplished staging of Handel’s delightful pasticcio Giove in Argo

David Nice Artsdesk.com

 

‘……From the moment of her first appearance as Iside, this young woman impressed me with her stage presence. I loved her performance last year as Tauride in Arianna in Creta and this year I felt she commanded the stage for the first two acts. It is a big voice, and as the noble, rather tormented Isis who is briefly distracted by the charms of Giove disguised as a shepherd, I thought she offered a brilliant showcase of fiery coloratura, a comic, flirtatious interplay with Giove in “Taci, e spera” and warmth and beauty of sound in melancholy, plaintive arias. It is almost a shame she is joining the Glyndebourne chorus, having already been identified as a budding principal by both ETO and Wexford. I know there are some good, reliable mezzos out there, but I feel Ms Bienek has something extra…’

Thomas Molke OMM.de

 

‘…No doubt about it, Kezia Bienek had star quality from the start, a disciplined stage animal with a finely-controlled metal about the voice which marked her out not so much as the advertised mezzo – though she certainly has the lower register – but as a potential ideal for Mozart’s Elettra and Donna Anna (invocation of furies and grief over a dead father simply underlined the resemblances). Bienek, Cummings and the orchestra between them also persuaded us that the two interpolated arias by one Francesco Araja were well up to the mark of Handel in full spate…’

David Nice Artsdesk.com

 

‘…Kezia Bienek (Iside) possesses a mezzo voice of rare quality, matched by a natural ability as an actress. She’s off to join the Glyndebourne chorus this summer; expect to hear more of her in the future…..Bienek, when not fighting off the amorous intentions of Gyula Rab’s goaty Arete, made a compelling advocate for Araja’s arresting music…’

Stephen Pritchard Theguardian.com

 

‘…The one who caught my attention right from the beginning was Kezia Bienek’s commanding Iside. Her voice, a luxurious mezzo-soprano, already seems to have the power and control of a seasoned professional; but her acting was also compelling to watch. Hair slicked back, formidable, swaggering and short-tempered, this was an Iside to cast fear into the hearts of men….’

Leander theidlewoman.blogspot.co.uk

 


 

Il Tabarro Puccini
Wexford Festival Opera Nov 2014

 

‘…..In den kleineren Partien lassen Andrew Tipple als Talpa mit markantem Bass und Kezia Bienek
als Frugola mit samtweichem Mezzo aufhorchen’

Thomas Molke OMM.de

 

‘….La Frugola was assumed by Kezia Bienek with her bright, forward mezzo complete
with a somewhat rapid vibratothat had great, personalized character ‘

James Sohre Mvdaily.com

 

‘….y la mezzo soprano Kezia Bienek como Frugola, que me produjo una favorable impresión.’

José M. Irurzun operaworld.es

 

‘…..Mezzo-soprano Kezia Bienek is similarly excellent bringing a great realism and comic releif in
her role as la Frugola’

Anna Hayes,Wexford Echo Newspaper

 


 

La Gazzetta Rossini
RCMIOS 25/28 June 2014

 

‘…In a thrilling performance, Karpiak’s good looks and stage presence endear him immediately to the audience. Kezia Bienek is also immediately believable as his lover, Doralice, innocent and sincere, her lustrous soprano always a delight.’

Charlotte Valori bachtrack.com

 

‘…and Kezia Bienek’s winsome and winning Doralice.’

Nick Breckenfield classicalsource.com

 


 

Arianna in Creta Handel
London Handel Festival, Britten Theatre 3/5 March 2014

 

“….The greatest performance came from the Kezia Bienek as Tauride. She was the only performer I felt had formed a complete character, and even though it at times bordered on the camp, especially in Act III, she was a delight to watch. Her coloratura was accomplished, although Tauride’s arias are not as blatantly showy as Teseo’s or Arianna’s. Ahead of the performance, it was announced that she was suffering from both sinusitis and laryngitis, but any vocal indisposition was virtually undetectable.”

Aksel Tollåli – Bachtrach.com

 

“….Kezia Bienek sang with commitment and vibrancy, making the dramatic best of the arias and certainly putting them over vividly, including a wonderful aria with obligato horns.”

Robert Hugill – PlanetHugill.com

 

“….Kezia Bienek took on the trousers role of Tauride. An apology was announced before the start with the news that she was suffering from both laryngitis and sinusitis, but you wouldn’t have known it. I think her voice is a rich and attractive one with a lot of potential. There was a lovely bloom to the voice in more sustained passages. But Miss Bienek not only did herself great credit, she also seized the opportunity of displaying her potential. Her acting in the trouser role was excellent, full of the necessary arrogance and swagger”

Miranda Jackson – Operabritannia.com

 

“….Several others had their moments – Kezia Bienek’s Tauride, a real strutting cock”

Geoff Brown – The Times

 


 

L’heure Espagnole Ravel
RCMIOS, Britten Theatre 4/7 December 2013

 

“….Musically all were good, but Kezia Bienek stood out as Concepción – this is a voice of considerable power, incisive beauty, and is strong in every register. One senses that there is yet more to be unlocked and I look forward to seeing her sing again.”

Capriccio Blogspot

 

“….Kezia Bienek offered a properly feminine Concepcíon, housewifely languor and determination to avail herself of what her visitors can – and cannot – provide.”

Mark Berry – Seenandheard-international.com

 

“….All five got the balance between acting and singing just right. The curvaceous Kezia Bienek’s Concepción was a voluptuous pragmatist to be reckoned with, her frustration as dalliance-time ticked by vividly realised by her bright, full soprano.”

Peter Reed – classicalsource.com